Psalm 3


One of the enemies most ardent and frequent attacks upon the people of God is the threat of lost salvation. I am certain no greater damage is done to the kingdom than by this hellish attack. I am not mumbling about that flawed and heretical doctrine that God is going to drop you like a hot potato if you sin – though it’s damage is equally horrible. I am here concerned with the damage the evil one inflicts upon God’s true servants by hinting to them that they have lost or have not gained salvation. The answer to the heresy is the answer to all heresy, gaining a knowledge of what the Bible does say and cling to it regardless of emotion.

In Psalm 3 we encounter just such a solution.

A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son. O Lord, how my adversaries have increased!
Many are rising up against me.
Many are saying of my soul, “There is no deliverance for him in God.”

Selah.

But You, O Lord, are a shield about me, My glory, and the One who lifts my head.

I was crying to the Lord with my voice, And He answered me from His holy mountain.

Selah.

I lay down and slept; I awoke, for the Lord sustains me.
I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people Who have set themselves against me round about.

Arise, O Lord; save me, O my God!
For You have smitten all my enemies on the cheek; You have shattered the teeth of the wicked.

Salvation belongs to the Lord; Your blessing be upon Your people!
Selah.
(Psalm 3, NASB95)

The opening ascription says that David wrote of it regarding his flight from Absalom; in that context we must understand that when David writes of no deliverance for his soul he is not – as far as I can tell- speaking of eternal damnation but rather loss of his physical life being all but guaranteed. Nevertheless there is, I think, a valid application of this Psalm to the frequent attacks of the enemy and the solution embedded in God’s word.

The answer to the accusation of lost salvation (no rhyme intended) is embedded in the third verse. The enemy may shout long and loud; or more likely will whisper soft and frequent that our lives are forfeit any hope of redemption – yet it is not the taunts of the enemy which we must trust. It is the very person of God himself. “But You, O Lord, are a shield about me…”

It is not up to you to maintain your salvation just as it was not up to you to obtain it in the first place. It is up to the character of God who has himself declared salvation for them who will in repentance accept the Lord Jesus as their savior.

The remainder of the Psalm also comes into play in terms of Spiritual Warfare: “Arise, O Lord; save me, O my God!” Let the Lord shatter the teeth of the demonic beings who taunt.

As for you, embrace the deliverance guaranteed in Jesus Christ and do not give heed to the diabolical whispers of the enemy.